IIT Delhi director on QS World University Rank: “Doesn’t make me happy”

V Ramgopal Rao, Director of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, stated that the institute's performance in the recently announced Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World Rankings 2022 doesn't make him completely happy.

IIT Delhi director on QS World University Rank: “Doesn’t make me happy”
IIT Delhi

New Delhi: IIT Delhi is India’s second-best college in India, according to the QS World College Rankings 2022. Since last year, the institute has climbed from 193rd to 185th place, passing IISc Bangalore in the process. V Ramgopal Rao, Director of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, stated on Wednesday that the institute’s performance in the recently announced Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World Rankings 2022 doesn’t make him completely happy, but that the top institutes in India could be among the many top 50 establishments in the world if they improve their efficiency in just a few areas.

“IIT Delhi has improved its ranking by 8 places and we have shown an improvement in 5 out of 6 ranking parameters. But it doesn’t make me happy or elated. Our top institutions in India can be among the top 50 in any of the World University Rankings,” Prof Rao mentioned in a observe to his colleagues, college students, and workers members.

“IIT jobs are government jobs. Recruiting international faculty is still riddled with policy issues at all levels… but we need to go global in our faculty hiring. We are trying, but it takes time. It can’t be changed overnight,” he remarked.

IITs need to admit more international students, but not at the cost of Indian students who wish to join these institutes, Prof Rao said. “India simply needs to create a lot more high-quality institutions so the pressure on IIT admissions comes down,” he added.

IIT Delhi stated that 50 percent of the points for QS rankings are based on reputation, and that Indian schools may improve their academic reputation by becoming more prominent. “We need to talk more about ourselves and our research accomplishments to the public (both in India and abroad).” Simply put, we need to be more visible. “It’s critical to reach out.”

Prof Rao added that institutes must also enhance their faculty-to-student ratio, which adds 20% to QS rankings. Finding “IIT quality faculty” is challenging, he continued, because it is primarily limited to Indians or persons of Indian ancestry. “Because of the EWS quota implementation, the older IITs have added 2500 more students in the last two years. So, for circumstances beyond our control, we took a hit on this,” he explained.

“It’s important for all of us to have this perspective so we can educate general public about this. It’s also important for all of us to work together on this…you can replace IIT Delhi with Bombay or other top institutions from India, and the story remains the same,” Prof Rao said.

(Gauri Dhiman)